Why Some Black People Don’t Care About Justine Damond’s Murder

Yes, I’ve heard and (kinda) followed the police-involved shooting of Justine Damond, a white woman. And to be honest, I don’t really care.

Call me callous. Call me a lot of names. I seriously don’t care. Why? Because America doesn’t give a flying fuck when black people are killed by police. Why the hell should I cry for a white person who was a victim of the same murderous co-ed fraternity who would shoot me without a slightest bit of restraint because black men scare the shit out of them?

Damond, however, was the perfect victim, an innocent victim, at least that’s what her family’s lawyer said. And why? Simple. She was a white woman, the epitome of innocence America must care for.

The Root explains:

Many black people resent that she is receiving such heartfelt reactions because we never get them. Media outlets were too busy investigating Sandra Bland’s criminal past to post Facebook posts recognizing the tragedy of her death. Police chiefs don’t get fired when black people are harmed, and mayors rarely—if ever—jump ahead of police investigations to say that a black person’s death at the hands of one of their cops should not have happened. And we’re never considered the “innocent victim.”

Damond is receiving compassion, and rightfully so. But what about us? Why can’t society hurt for us as it does for Damond? The answer is simple: America has told black Americans, “Fuck you since 1619 Jamestown” because our black skin does not register in white America’s psyche as worthy of mourning.

That hurts. A lot.

But we know that America doesn’t think we’re hurting, or capable of being hurt. Many people think our suffering is imagined and will barf up weak-ass explanations or will just make you feel as though you’re crazy when you try to explain. In as many words as possible, they’ll tell you that they don’t give a fuck about you, your pain or your life.

Yet, they act as if they’re lost as to why we start giving no fucks about them. The Root’s article continues:

Some of us express that hurt with indifference. Others harden to the world around us and economize our feelings. God may tell us to love indiscriminately, but our human condition sometimes tells us not to give a damn about white people who, historically, have not opened their hearts to us. It’s a perfectly reasonable reaction. Black Americans are a heartbroken people, and some of us no longer have the capacity to express grief beyond our race. That’s not black people’s fault. That’s what unchecked white supremacy can do to its victims.

There will be those who will say, “We can’t be as heartless as our oppressors,” or “Fighting for justice shouldn’t be based on race.” I disagree. Before black people can extend compassion to people outside of our race, I find it imperative that we heal spiritually first. We owe no one our empathy. No matter how much we suffer, we are expected to dig deeper into our humanity to feel for those who cannot feel for us until they are hurt.

So, the bottom line is that if White America wants us to start caring about unjust murders of people like Damond, they have to start caring about us and the shit we go through. No exceptions and no excuses. If not, they shouldn’t expect us to shed tears for them, but their culture of white privilege permits them to do so.

Excuse us while we roll our eyes while we try to find ways to survive in this wilderness and treat the wounds they inflict upon us on a daily basis.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Why Some Black People Don’t Care About Justine Damond’s Murder

  1. White people want us to hold their hand and coddle them, through our own pain! I have nothing to give Damond. I’m saving my energy for the next Black Death at the hands of the police.

    She’s got plenty of prayers and compassion, her family gon’ be awwright!

  2. Truly, my mentality is “1 less white person on the planet”. BYE!!! 🙋👏👌✊
    I’m more than certain many of them share my sentiment when one of “us” dies. And as far as her being innocent, how the hell do we know? We can only go with what the mainstream media reports to us, which nowadays is racked with “alternative facts” aka LIES!!!

  3. To be honest, I am not surprised by the reaction where are seeing from the public (Black or White)(Left or Right) the police chief, city officials and even the Lawyer who by the way was the lawyer for the Philandro Castile Family. Yes the one that said she is possibly the MOST innocent victim of a police shooting. How is one more are less innocent than the other? You are either Innocent or you are guilty. Once again the obviousness of Americas complete lack of concern for black life is displayed with no concern. How many messages do we need to realize they see us as sub human. I am so numb.

  4. Hey Brotha Wolf,
    You bring up a complicated process with this post, it’s appreciated.

    You said: “And to be honest, I don’t really care.”

    Is this strictly because she is white, is it the politics (history included)/media coverage? Or a combination.

    “Some of us express that hurt with indifference. Others harden to the world around us and economize our feelings. God may tell us to love indiscriminately, but our human condition sometimes tells us not to give a damn about white people who, historically, have not opened their hearts to us. It’s a perfectly reasonable reaction.”

    Yes the reaction is absolutely reasonable. The question/challenge becomes do we stay in this reaction? Personally, I actively try not to. Why? Simply, I value human life.

    That doesn’t mean I don’t face the same issues this post highlights. I just try to anchor myself in the valuation of human life because that is the goal, in the beginning and end. I try not to let racism and its history cloud that (for too long anyway). Nor do I judge anyone who is facing/struggling with this issue.

    Though I will say “reasoning” the reaction is not enough (not in the long term). Reason alone can become the author of rationalization and justification; effectively avoiding/distorting our feelings. Not protesting for Justine Diamond’s is one thing, not caring (can be inward not outward) that she unjustly lost her life, well that is different. Taking the perspective of @thedevilfindswork (“1 less white person”), should compel us toward deeper self-examination.

    “Black Americans are a heartbroken people, and some of us no longer have the capacity to express grief beyond our race. That’s not black people’s fault. That’s what unchecked white supremacy can do to its victims.”

    Yes, oppression is insidiously effective. For anyone who is at this point my heart goes out to you. Yet herein lies a salient issue; oppression seeks to keep us inferior. Staying focused on blame and being unable to move past victimhood wears on us. The point isn’t about blaming black people (though I know others do), it’s about finding our own strength, our own voice to live a life not dictated or led by oppression.

    “There will be those who will say, “We can’t be as heartless as our oppressors,” or “Fighting for justice shouldn’t be based on race.” I disagree. Before black people can extend compassion to people outside of our race, I find it imperative that we heal spiritually first. We owe no one our empathy. No matter how much we suffer, we are expected to dig deeper into our humanity to feel for those who cannot feel for us until they are hurt.”

    Deep. Self-compassion is greatly needed for self-healing. No we don’t owe anyone our empathy, but dare I say for sustained change, empathy (and compassion) is needed. Our immense acts of forgiveness and compassion are often overlooked.
    “No matter how much we suffer, we are expected to dig deeper into our humanity to feel for those who cannot feel for us until they are hurt.”

    This represents the ultimate struggle. I wish I had some words that would make the attempt at this make sense, but I don’t, not in an effectively meaningful way.

    So all I can say to our people is to take solace in digging deeper; this internal work is for you as much as it is for them. Show pride in feeling for others, every storm needs a lighthouse.Have hope that your light shines brightly enough, that others will see it reflected in themselves.

    You said: “If not, they shouldn’t expect us to shed tears for them, but their culture of white privilege permits them to do so. Excuse us while we roll our eyes while we try to find ways to survive in this wilderness and treat the wounds they inflict upon us on a daily basis.”

    Brotha Wolf, again I appreciate this post.

    For many people I know the “personal is political,” and separating the two takes a herculean act. For any who have not gotten there, that is fine, we all walk the long road our life takes us. Though as we struggle with this process, I will say we shouldn’t condone or promote any hatred or vitriol, because in many ways begins to represent us becoming a reflection of the oppression we are trying to separate ourselves from.

    PF-T

  5. ” And to be honest , I really don’t care .”

    I sympathize with you and everybody else on here about Justine. When she got shot, a part of me wondered where were the ” She’s a thug”..mantra that so many of us have/had to deal with? When I looked at her case, I seen a lot of ” White privilege ” stuff that Black people and other POC’s would never get: the sympathies, law enforcement being forced to retire or being called ” the most innocent victim”. Like Black kids of police violence are not. Just last night, a 17 year old Bronx teen was released from Rikers on bail for a crime he didn’t commit and thankfully he is alive to tell his story. He was an honor student on his way to college on a scholarship and never got into any trouble of no sort, yet Pedro Hernandez wasn’t called ” the most innocent victim” neither was the late Kalief Browder, Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin or Aiyana Stanley. If they want to make some kind of sick racist excuse of them getting shot, it was said that Mrs Rusczyzk was bamming on the officer’s car like a maniac before she was killed. If that would have any of us to do that , we would be called animals and be disposed of in a second.

    You just keep singing the same song over and over about law enforcement ” Whites gets justice while innocent Blacks get busted..unjustly. It’s not so much that you become cold and desensitized about these situations but it becomes too predictable..from what the verdict will be to know the reactions of the police…you pretty much know. Even when a cop is ” indicted ” that becomes predictable because you know that they rarely get convicted and imprisoned for their crimes…unless..you know..you’re a POC. It gets to a point where you’re not as bothered about the verdict..because you already know the likely answer to that question.

  6. “Why the hell should I cry for a white person who was a victim of the same murderous co-ed fraternity who would shoot me without a slightest bit of restraint because black men scare the shit out of them?”

    White women who chase after Black men scare them, because it is a reminder that white men AREN’T superior to Black men.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s