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Tell me if you’ve heard something like this before.

A white person reports that he, she or someone she knows who’s also white is a victim of a crime, usually one that involves violence. This person tells the police that the suspect is black. There’s immediately a search for this black suspect as well as an investigation as to whether or not the person’s story is authentic.

In time, police conclude – with evidence – that there was no black criminal. However, in some cases, a crime actually did occur, but it was committed by the person who made the report in the first place. And this person came up with the nonexistent black suspect to get away with it, because of the prevalent criminal black male stereotype that society doesn’t want to get rid of, the overblown fear of black-on-white crime and its pathological denial of its race problem.

Well, it happened again. US Uncut reports:

Courtney Chancellor called campus police at around 8:30pm, reporting that while she was delivering food for sandwich chain Jimmy John’s, a young 6 foot tall black man with facial hair and an upper arm tattoo “flashed a gun near Wolpers Hall and demanded money.”

Authorities initially sent out security alerts to students, faculty, staff, and local news outlets, encouraging thousands of people to be on the lookout for the fictional black man.

When MUPD reviewed evidence from nearby surveillance cameras and confronted Chancellor – who is not a student at the campus – she confessed to falsely claiming a robbery…

…It is currently unknown why Chancellor faked the robbery, or why she chose to describe her attacker as a black stereotype. She has since been arrested for filing a false report.

There have been cases where no crime was committed. Yet, there have been white people who knowingly chose to make one up and blame it on a black man that never existed or has blamed an actual black man for a crime he didn’t commit despite the devastating effect it will have on that man and black people in general. Emmett Till anyone?

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