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In a small, mostly white populated town of Harrison, Arkansas, a billboard stands, courtesy of none other than the KKK. It’s not too surprising when you consider that the area has a reputation of being one of the most hate-filled downs in existence filled to the brim of hate groups. So, seeing a KKK billboard that states that “it’s not racist to love your people” is like putting vanilla icing on the pile of shit. Hate groups, as of late, are trying desperately to change their image as opposed to doing something much substantial like – I dunno – change their ideologies, practices and overall views on race, especially nonwhites.

Typically, they see hating on nonwhites means loving whites. They are most likely the same people who believe that helping blacks and browns in some way means taking away from whites. They may also believe that to be anti-racist is equal to being anti-white. In short, they follow a formula that suggests that if one group gets help, another group suffers. When it comes to many white people, they think helping nonwhites in anyway is detrimental to white people. Thus, they conclude that they are the new “victims” or racism.

As far as the good white Christian folk of Harrison goes, they’re following in the bootstraps of hate groups by living on the one formula that not only survived all these years, but have influenced more and more whites to uphold the equation. White pride and white love would have to come from the hatred of nonwhites, or vice versa.

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In my opinion, it’s nothing short of pathological, not to mention stupid, to believe that to love oneself or his/her group means you have to be a hater of others. Usually, that hints there’s a shallow kind of admiration for the group you supposedly have pride for. In other words, what’s so great about being white that you have to, or want to, hate nonwhites?

There’s nothing wrong with being what you are, and that includes white people. Everyone should love what they are. The problem with the people in Harrison, Arkansas and in hate groups all across the nation is that their “pride” came from hatred. That is not true love, especially when you have hatred. If anything, it shows that those who commit themselves to the myth that somehow being white is to be superior above all people, are hiding their own individual inadequacies.

Those so-called white supremacists have nothing to show for their own. No achievements to speak of. No accolades to be proud of. Nothing notable. So, they latch on the accomplishments, both real and fictional, of other whites, also both real and fictional, and assume that just because they share the same skin color, that means they are the superior species.

What I find strange is that even those the white male power structure exists, those hate groups still think that white people are oppressed. Somehow they think that said power structure is occupied by Jews, and somehow they’re different than whites. Does that make sense?

Again, there’s nothing wrong with being white. There is a problem with thinking that such pride comes at a price of stepping on other races. If that’s the case, there’s nothing to be proud of when you’re a hater.

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