Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Real Thought: Men Are Sluts…No Really, They Are

Thinking about even the most sexually explicit situations one can think of, when you think of the phrase “running a train” (when a group of people who are usually friends all have sex with one person), you think of sexually charged, indifferent guys who are all scraping for a chance with a woman. Be it her consent or not, which is really horrible to even think about, they’re all willing to engage in the event.

Going deeper, men are willing to drug, deceive and even force women to have sex with them. Men are also willing to pay to have sex with women. Even if it’s just a tease from an erotic dancer, majority of the customers are men. The porn industry’s best customer are and let’s get the drum rolling here: MEN!

Yes even with this all in consideration it is women who are labeled whores. It is women are who “slut shamed” and given many names they never asked for such as thot, bust down, and whatever new term they could think of provided by yours truly, MEN. For exploring their sexuality or not inviting intruders in at all, women are blamed for men’s actions.

Lucy: Why I’m Tired of Seeing White People on the Big Screen

Lucy is about what humankind could be — it’s about possibilities. As Lucy’s brainpower grows stronger and the volume of knowledge she is able to access increases, she delivers monologues about how little humans understand about death, existence, and the universe, mediating on time and history. The film likes to think of itself as reimagining everything that we think we know about humanity, and presents to us their vision of what the most evolved woman on earth looks like:

A blonde white woman.

See, I just can’t get right with that.

Co-Screenwriter of ‘Noah’ Explains Why There Are No Black People Or POC In The Film

Well, in a new interview on the website The High Calling (HERE) the co-screenwriter of the film Ari Handel, who wrote Noah with Aronofsky, was asked about the lack of diversity and addressed by saying:

“From the beginning, we were concerned about casting, the issue of race. What we realized is that this story is functioning at the level of myth, and as a mythical story, the race of the individuals doesn’t matter. They’re supposed to be stand-ins for all people. Either you end up with a Bennetton ad or the crew of the Starship Enterprise.”

He goes on to say:

“You either try to put everything in there, which just calls attention to it, or you just say, “Let’s make that not a factor, because we’re trying to deal with everyman.” Looking at this story through that kind of lens is the same as saying, “Would the ark float and is it big enough to get all the species in there?” That’s irrelevant to the questions because the questions are operating on a different plane than that; they’re operating on the mythical plane.”

The Media’s Pro-Israel Bias: Why Does TV News Look Like a Netanyahu Ad?

In years of reporting from and about Israel, I’ve followed the frequently robust debate in its press about whether Netanyahu really wants a peace deal, about the growing power of right-wing members inside the Israeli cabinet opposed to a Palestinian state, about the creeping air of permanence to the occupation.

So it has been all the more striking to discover a far narrower discourse in Washington and the notoriously pro-Israel mainstream media in the US at a time when difficult questions are more important than ever. John Kerry, the US secretary of state, and a crop of foreign leaders have ratcheted up warnings that the door for the two-state solution is closing, in no small part because of Israel’s actions. But still the difficult questions go unasked.

Bill O’Reilly Pretends the Blatant Racial Injustice of the Drug War Doesn’t Exist

O’Reilly expressed his opinion on legalization by saying, “It damages the children more than anyone, and poor second.” Drawing the distinction between “the children” and “the poor” supports an implicit understanding that some children are more worthy of concern and protection than others. O’Reilly even boldly asserted, “The left is basically saying…it’s blacks. You’re trapping the blacks. Because in certain ghetto neighborhoods, it’s part of the culture – nine-year-old boys and girls who are smoking it. And they don’t like that. They don’t want those kids to be targeted by the cops.”

What is O’Reilly saying? That nine-year-olds from “the ghetto” should be targeted by cops? Furthermore, black youth – the group most associated in our national consciousness as constituting the children of “the ghetto” – use illegal drugs less frequently overall than white youth. And we must all be alarmed and ashamed when we hear yet another “ghetto” culture argument enter our policy conversations. This language reflects a long history of demonizing and criminalizing marginalized communities – particularly those of color – through racially biased narratives about drugs.

Advertisements