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Where’s the Collective Outrage On Behalf of Black Women?

The reaction to DL Hughley’s recent comments about Columbus Short’s estranged wife Tanee McCall-Short is yet another example of just how quickly people turn a blind eye to the concerns of Black women, particularly when a Black man is involved.

While Black leaders rallied against Don Imus for calling the Rutgers women’s basketball team “nappy headed hoes” (Hughley defended him, by the way), our “leaders” have been (un)surprisingly silent after DL Hughley insinuated that most women who claim to have been abused by their husbands are just “emotional broads” who don’t know how to keep their feelings in check.

After his co-host Jasmine Sanders broached the topic of Short’s marital drama, Hughley told her, “I think that broad shouldn’t be telling all his business if she gone take him to court.”

55 Colleges Face Sexual Assault Investigations

“We are making this list available in an effort to bring more transparency to our enforcement work and to foster better public awareness of civil rights,” Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights Catherine E. Lhamon said in a statement. “We hope this increased transparency will spur community dialogue about this important issue. I also want to make it clear that a college or university’s appearance on this list and being the subject of a Title IX investigation in no way indicates at this stage that the college or university is violating or has violated the law.”

Women who have filed complaints leading to such investigations have long criticized the Education Department for shielding schools under investigation and for not providing enough transparency on the reviews. Prior to the list’s release, the department only confirmed when a school was under review upon request, which usually resulted from disclosure by a complainant or the school. The department has typically released information about an investigation after a resolution has been reached.

A bipartisan group of 39 members of Congress in January joined the criticisms, calling for the department to end the “guessing game” about which colleges are under investigation.

BART Police Respond to Alleged Dancing on Train, Arrest and Assault Young Woman

When 19-year-old Nubia Bowe was returning home on BART with friends on the evening of March 21, she had no idea that it would be the worst night of her life.

The evening ended up with her being accused by police of intimidating a witness and her friends being handcuffed for dancing on a BART train. She was slammed to the ground and struck repeatedly, arrested and sent to the county jail for four days. She now faces now four misdemeanors and was kicked out of school.

That’s what happened when BART police responded to a complaint that young men were dancing and soliciting money on a train at the Lake Merritt station. Bowe and her friends, who had not seen anyone dancing on the train, were picked out as the culprits by one witness, who later recanted.

However, her friends were handcuffed and detained, even though a train full of witnesses repeatedly told police the young people were not the perpetrators.

But the arrest was the only the beginning of the ordeal. Bowe was slammed to the ground, handcuffed and accused of resisting arrest, among other charges.

Hundreds of kidnapped Nigerian school girls reportedly sold as brides to militants for $12, relatives say

First, the Nigerian military reported that 129 school girls had been taken from the northeastern state of Borno. Then it claimed that all of the girls but eight had been released. This soon proved false. Few, if any, had been released. In fact, parents said an additional 100 girls beyond original estimates had also been taken. In all, 234 school girls are today suspected captured.

Parents have grown increasingly frustrated by what they perceive as a feckless governmental response. Some relatives have launched their own search, riding motorcycles deep into the surrounding forests in search of their girls. “My wife keeps asking me, why isn’t the government deploying every means to find our children,” relative Dawah said.

“All we want from the government is to help us bring our children back,” one father named Pogu Yaga, wept.
The missing girls have ignited a social media campaign underneath the hashtag #BringBackOurDaughters, and the issue has stirred concern in the highest echelons of British society. “We cannot stop terrorism overnight,” said former Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who plans to visit Nigeria. “But we can make sure that its perpetrators are aware that murdering and abducting school children is a heinous crime that the international authorities are determined to punish.”
Nothing, however, has brought back the girls, now missing for 16 days.

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