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African Heads of State All Go Nuts

Warren Ellis, congratulations.

Your racist rhetoric about Nelson Mandela and Africa still manages to be trump any sick garbage Santorum, Cheney, Limbaugh have spewed.

And to use a comic book that’s an allegory to blacks/Civil Rights to spout off your white supremacy is what the kids call a Dick Move.

But what’s been fascinating is that while white liberals are soooo quick to condemn Santorum, Cheney, and look good in the process, suddenly the e-crickets are deafening when it comes to calling out anything that harshes their white fandom squee.

But given how white fandom is so quick to give Steve Moffat a pass on his racism/misogyny/homophobia, I’m not the least bit surprised.

Racist hacks like Ellis are exactly the reason why “terrorists” like Mandela are a necessity.

How it Feels to be a Whistleblower

In the fall of 2009, on the advice of a lawyer, a young police officer named Adhyl Polanco started wearing a recording device during roll call at his precinct in the South Bronx, one of the poorest congressional districts in the country. Among the contents captured over a couple of months of secret tapings was repeated instruction that officers complete “20 and 1.” According to testimony from the union delegate whom Polanco had captured on tape, that meant officers were required to fulfill 20 summonses and make one arrest within 20 to 22 days of patrol—regardless of whether they reasonably suspected criminal activity was taking place. According to the federal judge who this August ruled the New York Police Department’s practice of stop-and-frisk unconstitutional, Polanco’s evidence helped provide “a rare window into how the NYPD’s policies are actually carried out.” And thus, she continued, “I give great weight to the contents of these recordings.” The price for Officer Polanco, 33, however was steep—and he’s still paying for it, today. After a decade on the force, the last three of which he has been in a kind of blue-walled purgatory, Polanco says he looks forward to ultimately leaving the force, fishing and spending time with his three young boys. Colorlines caught up with him at his new precinct, “five tolls and $22.50 one-way from my home,” he says, in a Brooklyn neighborhood with eight storefront churches on the next block up. Polanco only had an hour so we talked in his parked car, outside the precinct in full view of officers gathering outside or walking by.

Illegible Black Death: Denied Media, Mourning, and Mobilization – The Feminist Wire

The denied innocence/criminalization of Black bodies is commonplace and helps us understand the silence from gun rights activists groups. “African-Americans are not allowed such protections by the White Gaze. They are viewed as guilty until proven innocent, a criminal Other who is a priori categorized as ‘suspicious’ and ‘dangerous,’ writes Chauncey Vega. “While formal racism and Jim and Jane Crow were shattered and defeated by the Black Freedom Struggle, this ugly cloud continues to hover over the United States, some 400 years after the first Black slaves were brought to the country.” The hundreds dead in Chicago and the killing of Trayvon Martin lead to stories that seemingly turn victims into criminals; even those not criminalized are imagined as complicit and culpable for their own death. Whether citing past arrests, suspensions, drug use, clothing choices, or attitude, whether arguing that they should have known better than to go to strangers’ houses late at night or they should guard against prejudiced whites, the presumption of Black guilt shapes national conversations about gun violence. This group cannot be saved or helped. Such narratives are commonplace within the media, from the Right, from 2nd Amendment “birthers,” from defense legal teams, and countless others. Yet, the failure of liberals and gun-right advocates to spotlight these instances, to focus on race.

Police say teen shot self in head – while hand cuffed behind back

A strange phenomenon has been occurring in police custody around the U.S., which seems to defy both the laws of physics and the limits of human physiology. Young people of color, handcuffed with their hands bound behind their backs, are able to shoot themselves in the head. For the critical observer, belief is beggared.

As I noted last year, twice in six months, young men have managed to shoot themselves in the head while in handcuffs in the back of police cars. And now again, a North Carolina teen has died of a gunshot wound that police say was self-inflicted while the young man was in handcuffs.

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